A WORLD WITHOUT ETHANOL?

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Imagining a World Without Ethanol
By Rick Tolman
Chief Executive Officer
National Corn Growers Association
When the price of oil hit, and then passed beyond, $100 a barrel, headlines were made. This week, an even more newsworthy headline has surfaced. All it could take is one major disruption and oil can hit $200 a barrel, according to analysts from Goldman Sachs.
And yet, despite the far-reaching impact oil has on our economy, and despite the fact that we are still depending on nations that would be described as somewhat less than respectful of basic human rights, there are people who refuse to recognize corn ethanol for what it is ? a way to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Right now.
We accept the usual caveats ? corn ethanol is not the solution, but part of the solution. We accept that corn ethanol is not the only biofuel out there. We see great promise in cellulosic ethanol, but we recognize it is just that: promise. Something we need to work on for the future. And a promise we cannot achieve without the contributions of corn ethanol.
For now, corn ethanol is an efficient fuel source that is available, affordable and American. It has decades of research behind it and is growing even more efficient.
But what if we were to stop using it? Well, a few recent reports detail the economic benefits of ethanol.
Recently, at the 25x25 Renewable Energy Summit, Terry Francl, the American Farm Bureau Federation?s senior economist, discussed two financial benefits of ethanol. First off, it reduces the price of a gallon of gas by 5 to 10 cents.
Doesn?t sound like all that much, does it? Nationally, that?s a savings of between $7 billion and $14 billion.
Further, with higher crop prices, federal support for farmers is reduced by $8 billion to $12 billion each year.
Taken together, the savings are between $15 billion and $25 billion. Reduce that by tax credits for ethanol, and you still have a net positive impact of $11 billion to $21 billion.
In its recent report on the economic impact of the ethanol industry, the Renewable Fuels Association found that in 2007 ethanol supported more than 230,000 U.S., jobs, put more than $12 billion into the pockets of American consumers, and generated more than $8 billion in tax revenue.
This is all great news for the American public and worthy of the headlines. But what?s the big headline grabber? It was syndicated writer Walter William? column last week resembling a loose collection of canards and urban legends strung together with a thin and weak thread. For a conservative libertarian, he found it too easy to buy into some the mistruths spread by alarmist fearmongers like Lester Brown.
Sure, these folks want to do away with ethanol. But where would that leave us? At present, there is no viable alternative that looks as good.
A country without ethanol would be a country with more foreign oil ? more expensive gasoline ? and more unemployment.
Sure, we want to be the ?Land of Plenty,? but not the land of plenty problems!
There is no free lunch.
Milton Friedman (1912 - 2006)
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The NCGA seems to be making an effort to get the word out about the issues concerning the American Farmer but, from my observation ithe MSM refuses to listen. I guess farmers are such a small part of the population that we are deemed insignificant. Society beliieves that all their "needs" should be provided to them for free, so they can buy all that they "want" .
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I agree farmgirl, but, they will have much more respect as they begin wondering where their food comes from.....the wheat shortage is just now making the news....heard about it this morning on early ABC news from NY.....

quote:
Originally posted by rfarmgirl

The NCGA seems to be making an effort to get the word out about the issues concerning the American Farmer but, from my observation ithe MSM refuses to listen. I guess farmers are such a small part of the population that we are deemed insignificant. Society beliieves that all their "needs" should be provided to them for free, so they can buy all that they "want" .


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Maybe our grain org's should spend some of our checkoff money to do a media campain to educate the comsumer, They need to do a better job of educating a consumer that no longer has any ag tyes. We can all b**** and complain,but if we don't set them straight no else will and we will have no one to blame but ourselves.
David Steffen
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quote:
Originally posted by steffy

Maybe our grain org's should spend some of our checkoff money to do a media campain to educate the comsumer, They need to do a better job of educating a consumer that no longer has any ag tyes. We can all b**** and complain,but if we don't set them straight no else will and we will have no one to blame but ourselves.
David Steffen


The groups with state checkoffs (corn and wheat) might be able to do advertising to educate the public about biofuels. However, the ones with a national checkoff would never get permission since it would viewed as political advocacy which is strictly prohibited
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steffy,Have you used any E-*85 yourself? The best way to promote something is to use it and tell others how it works. You don't need a flex fuel vehicle to burn e-85.I use it at 50% in regular car and truck and have good results with performance and fuel milage.
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quote:
Originally posted by tut

steffy,Have you used any E-*85 yourself? The best way to promote something is to use it and tell others how it works. You don't need a flex fuel vehicle to burn e-85.I use it at 50% in regular car and truck and have good results with performance and fuel milage.


Where there's one I hadn't thought of. If I understand you right, tut, you are using 1/2 E85 and 1/2 regular in your vehicles. Any change in performance, horsepower, gas mileage to report?
There is no free lunch.
Milton Friedman (1912 - 2006)
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I was under the impression from what I'd read that In order to burn e-85 you eitherhad to have a flex fuel vehicle, or convert the components of the fuel system to e-85 friendly material. Was thinking everything needed to be stainless for some reason? I'm sure any vehicle would burn it but wonder if there are any long term effects if your fuel system was not designed for it. Fuel injectors and rails are expensive components to replace so I have shyed away. Your starting to see more and more e-85 and Bio-Diesel pump pop up all over the place.
"Markets can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent" John Maynard Keynes
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Jabber, I have used e-85 for 1.5yrs with no problems. If your vehicle will run on e-10 it has all it needs to burn e-85 okay. The only thing that has happened is the check engine light comes on but it is because the sensor in the exhaust thinks the engine is running to lean. One tank of regular gas clears it up!!!!!
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quote:
Originally posted by tut

steffy,Have you used any E-*85 yourself? The best way to promote something is to use it and tell others how it works. You don't need a flex fuel vehicle to burn e-85.I use it at 50% in regular car and truck and have good results with performance and fuel milage.


My brother has been doing this for over 2 years on his Durango and gets the same mileage up to 1/2 & 1/2. After 25,000+ miles he has yet to replace a single part.
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